Zoë Heyn-Jones Zoë Heyn-Jones

CELTA TP6 Writing - 7 August 2020
Pre-Intermediate level

Description

In this lesson students learn how to write a short email (75-100 words) inviting friends (in another country) to visit them.

Materials

Abc TP6 Writing an Email Checklist

Main Aims

  • To enable students to practice writing a short email (75-100 words) inviting friends (in another country) to visit them.

Subsidiary Aims

  • To enable students to practice speaking fluency in the context of giving peers feedback on their email writing.
  • To increase students’ lexical range in the context of writing short informal emails.

Procedure

Lead-in (3-5 minutes) • To set lesson context and engage students

T greets Ss and welcomes them to class. [Title slide] T: Shows image of email [slide] T: Can you guess from this image what we’ll be learning tonight? Elicits answers from Ss. T: That’s right! Tonight we’ll be practicing writing emails. Has anyone written emails in English? [Elicits answers from Ss.] T: What kinds of emails have you written? [Elicits answers from Ss ad writes them on the slide] Examples: → personal: inviting friends over for dinner, planning a party, catching up with family, sending condolences, announcing the birth of a baby, ETC. → professional - work: scheduling a meeting, sending a link/document, sending feedback, ETC. → professional - studies: requesting a reference letter, scheduling a meeting with a professor, RSVPing for an event at school, asking Qs re: an assignment, ETC. T: Great! We can see that there are many types of emails that we might write in our day-to-day lives. And some of these types of emails are more formal than others. ___, can you tell me what I mean by ‘formal’? Formal: not relaxed and friendly; exactly correct by grammatical rules but not conversational. T: Let’s try grouping some examples of emails into ‘formal’ or ‘informal’ categories. Now I’ll send a link to an activity in the chat [describes activity - collaboratively sorting types of emails into ‘formal’ or ‘informal categories] [Sends link to Jamboard: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1LjUj9vfdS7SzmkoLWtD96BGdW56u9ZtjDpp7jnYxxGg/edit?usp=sharing ] FORMAL or INFORMAL? FORMAL: An email to a customer A job application An email to your manager A complaint to a shop An email to your professor INFORMAL: A birthday greeting to a colleague An email to a colleague who is also a good friend A social invitation to a friend An email with a link to a funny YouTube clip A message to a friend on a social networking site One thing to note is that emails (and all correspondence) is not strictly formal or informal; rather we can imagine a spectrum with formal on one end and informal on the other, with all communication falling somewhere in between.

Text Analysis (10-12 minutes) • To highlight and clarify useful language and form for coming productive tasks.

T gets Ss attention. T: Have a look at these two emails. Which one would be considered formal? Hi Laura, Many thanks for your help! See you next week. Cheers, Sandy Dear Ms. Castro, I am writing to thank you for all your help. I look forward to seeing you next week. With best wishes, Sandra Jones T: What are the clues that tell us that this one is formal? [T elicits parts of email from Ss before telling them] Salutation/greeting OR starting phrase: Dear Sign-off or ending phrase: With best wishes Longer and more grammatically correct sentences in the body of the email T: Now let’s brainstorm some formal and informal starting and ending phrases. I’m going to send you into breakout rooms with a partner to brainstorm for 3 minutes. Then we’ll come together as a full group and write them all down. ICQ: Are we brainstorming formal or informal phrases? [both!] ICQ: Are we working in pairs or small groups? [pairs] ICQ: How many minutes do we have [3 minutes] T sends Ss into breakouts rooms. Ss return to the main session for OCFB and fill in the chart: T: Okay, now let’s do an exercise with the same partners. I’m going to send you a link to the exercise in the chat. Sends link to Google form: https://forms.gle/cK8nhQ5bMfufTRbw7 Shows Ss exercise and explains: please complete the sentences... Let’s take 3 minutes to complete the exercise. ICQ: Are we filling in the blanks with these words? [yes] ICQ: Are we working in pairs or small groups? [pairs] ICQ: How many minutes do we have [3 minutes] T sends Ss into breakouts rooms. Ss return to the main session for OCFB and goes through the answers: Dear Nadia, I’m coming to the 'Teaching for Change' conference next week. I'm glad you are going, too. I'm arriving on Monday afternoon. I'll text you when I get to the hotel. Perhaps we can meet in the evening? Are you free to go out for a meal at about 7:30? Hope to see you soon, Lisa [Adapted from the British Council’s “English for Emails Unit 5: Making arrangements” https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/business-english/english-for-emails/unit-5-making-arrangements] T: Let’s do another exercise all together. I’m going to send you a link in the chat. Sends link to Jamboard: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1CmKaVH_bn1MLXxhr0PtWTa6E7B1T0yqMQIoL8Kv7eVo/edit?usp=sharing Let’s rearrange these phrases into the right order: A. I can call you then if it is convenient. B. Simon Mitchell C. Are you free to talk about it on the phone tomorrow at about 3.30? D. Head Teacher – Mexico City International School E. Could you please let me know? F. Dear Ms. Moore, G. I look forward to hearing from you soon. H. With best wishes, I. Thank you for your last email. [Adapted from the British Council’s “English for Emails Unit 5: Making arrangements” https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/business-english/english-for-emails/unit-5-making-arrangements] Answers: F. Dear Ms. Moore I. Thank you for your last email. C. Are you free to talk about it on the phone tomorrow at about 3.30? A. I can call you then if it is convenient. E. Could you please let me know? G. I look forward to hearing from you soon. H. With best wishes, B. Simon Mitchell D. Head Teacher – Mexico City International School

Productive Task(s) - Writing Practice (15-17 minutes) • To provide an opportunity to practice target productive skills

T gets Ss attention. T: Okay! Now we’re going to practice writing a short email (75-100 words) inviting friends (in another country) to visit. T: Here’s an example of an email that I wrote to my friend Kristen in London, England: [show image] T nominates S to read aloud: Dear Kristen, How are you? I hope this finds you well! It was such a pleasure to see you here in Mexico City last winter - I can't believe it was so long ago! It feels like just yesterday that you were here :) I hope you can come visit again soon! Our guest room is always available whenever you can make it - please do let me know what you think! Is there a time that might work best for you? Looking forward to seeing you soon! Very best wishes, Zoë Now let’s take 5 minutes to write your own individual emails. Remember, you’re writing to invite friends (in another country) to visit. After 5 minutes we’ll come back together and then I’ll send you to breakout rooms to share your email with your partner. ICQ: Are we writing formal emails to schedule a meeting? [no, we’re writing to invite a friend to visit] ICQ: Are we working individually or in pairs? [individually] ICQ: How many minutes do we have? [5 minutes] T: Does anyone need more time? [Offers more time if needed]. T: Okay, let’s share our email with our partner. You can do so by copying your text and pasting it in the chat, making sure to send it as a private message to your partner. T: Does everyone have each other’s emails? Great! Okay, now let’s take 3 minutes to read our partner’s email and make notes - do you notice any mistakes? Can you suggest any ways to make their messages better? ICQ: Are we reading our partner’s email? [yes] ICQ: Are we making notes to help them improve? [yes] ICQ: Are we working individually or in pairs? [individually] ICQ: How many minutes do we have? [3 minutes] T: Okay, now I’m going to send you to the breakout rooms to chat with your partner and share your feedback. We have five minutes to share feedback. ICQ: Are we writing another email? [no, we’re sharing our feedback with our partners] ICQ: Are we working individually or in pairs? [in pairs]] ICQ: How many minutes do we have? [5 minutes] T sends Ss to breakout rooms.

Feedback and Delayed Error Correction (8-10 minutes) • To provide feedback on students' production and use of language

[sends link to checklist in Google forms: https://forms.gle/X7a2GDnxaSdMQgBu9] T: Take 5 more minutes with your partner to go over the checklist, then we’ll come back together as a whole class for feedback. T: But before you go back to work with your partner, please send me your email in the chat. Remember to send it to me individually, not to everyone. ICQ: Are you sending me your email in the chat? [yes] ICQ: Are you working with your partner to make sure your email has everything listed on the checklist? [yes] ICQ: Are we working individually or in pairs? [in pairs]] ICQ: How many minutes do we have? [5 minutes] T collects all emails in the chat and sends Ss to breakout rooms. T calls Ss back to the main session. T addresses good language and errors noted while monitoring in breakout rooms and shares 1-2 of the best texts with the class. T thanks Ss for their time and their hard work and says goodnight :)

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