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Unit 18 DF Reading Lesson Plan
Intermediate level

Description

This is basically a reading lesson in the context of being an only child or having brothers and sisters. It provides the students with some visuals and enable them to discuss their ideas about being an only child or having brothers and sisters as lead-in as well as pre-reading activity. The lesson enables the students to practice in reading for gist, specific and detailed information through two texts from ‘The Younger Brother' by the novelist Tim Lott and 'The Only Child' by the journalist Sarah Lee. It also enables them to share their ideas about the advantages and disadvantages in small groups as post-reading activity.

Materials

Abc Pictures
Abc Pictures
Abc Student's Material

Main Aims

  • • To provide students with practice in reading for gist, specific information and details in the context of being an only child and having brothers and sisters.

Subsidiary Aims

  • To provide students with practice in speaking for fluency.

Procedure

Lead-in/ Pre-Reading (3-5 minutes) • To set lesson context and to prepare students for the text and make it accessible

Show pictures of an only child and three children who are brothers and sisters. Ask them what they see in the picture and to guess the context. After seeing they understand the context, ask them to talk to a partner about the answers of the following questions for two minutes. - Do you have brothers and sisters, or are you an only child? - Do you feel positive or negative about it? Why? Open class feedback. Ask one or two students to share their ideas with the class.

While-Reading #1 (8-10 minutes) • To provide students with less challenging gist reading task

Ask students to work in pairs as A and B. Ask A to read “The Younger Brother” and B to read “The Only Child” for two minutes. After they read their parts, ask them to talk about the answers of the following questions with their partners for three minutes. Tell them not to worry about the vocabulary in that stage. - What does the writer tell about his/ her family members? - How does the writer’s experience as a child affect him/ her now? - Whose childhood sounds happier? Monitor and help them when they need. Elicit the correct answers.

While-Reading #2 (8-10 minutes) • To provide students with less challenging specific information reading task

Ask students to look at the highlighted words in the two texts and try to work out their meaning from the context by reading them for two minutes. Ask them to work individually and match the words with their definitions 1-12 for three minutes. Remind them not to use their dictionaries at that moment but to try to guess the definitions from the context. Ask pairs to check their answers. Elicit the answers.

While-Reading #3 (10-12 minutes) • To provide students with more challenging detailed, deduction and inference reading task

Ask students to read the texts again for four minutes. After they read the texts again, ask them to mark the sentences T (true) or F (false) and correct the F sentences. Ask them to work individually for two minutes. Ask them to check their answers in pairs. Elicit the correct answers.

Post-Reading (8-10 minutes) • To provide with an opportunity to respond to the text and expand on what they've learned

Ask students to work in small groups (3 or 4 people in a group) and discuss the possible answers of the following question and explain their reasons for three minutes. Remind them to take notes of their ideas to report them later. - What are the advantages and disadvantages of being an only child and having brothers or sisters? Choose a person from each group and send them to different groups to report their own groups ideas for two minutes. Monitor the groups and take notes for plenary feedback. Ask a different person from each group for their ideas about the advantages and disadvantages. Praise students for the good language and finish off with some error correction.

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