Nisaa Mustafa Nisaa Mustafa

Teaching Practice 1
Upper Intermediate level

Description

In this lesson, students learn about functional language with a focus on different ways of saying ‘no’. The lesson starts with a discussion about various ways of saying no politely. This is followed by two exercises where they are acquainted with the four general domains under which we classify the ways of saying no. Finally, there is controlled practice through a fill in the blanks exercise and free practice through instant mini-role-plays.

Materials

Abc Extra task: saying no
Abc Language notes: saying no
Abc Saying no
Abc Functional Language: saying no

Main Aims

  • To introduce students to the functional language of saying no

Subsidiary Aims

  • To practice speaking for fluency

Procedure

Lead-in (3-5 minutes) • To set lesson context and engage students

Lead in from the last lesson and ask the students if they think paint balling sounds like fun. Then ask, Have any of you been invited by a friend to play paintball and you didn't want to go? How would to refuse him/her politely? - If paint balling doesn't generate much response then change the question. For example, Have any of you been invited by a friend to join for movie/dinner/coffee/any sport activity and you didn't want to go? How would you refuse him/her politely? - Write the responses of the students on the white board

First Test (diagnostic) (8-10 minutes) • To test student's current understanding and provide context for functional language through an exercise

- Tell students that they will learn polite ways of saying no - Give instructions about Exercise 1 and explain how to do it - Distribute the handouts and instruct them to work in pairs to choose the best answer. - Monitor and guide wherever needed - Once they are done with Exercise 1, play audio recording for them to check their answers. - If any student has a query regarding the exercise, try to solve it.

Teach (clarifying) (10-12 minutes) • To clarify the meaning, form and pronunciation of the functional language of saying no

Teach the students that the ways of saying no are classified under four general headings. Discuss the four general headings with them and tell them that they will be sorting the answers from Exercise 1 under these headings. - Teach them that the most polite way of saying no to an offer or invitation in English is to include both an apology and a reason why you are saying no. Example: In question 1, (Are you coming tonight?) the answer 'not really' is inappropriate because B's response needs to be either a clear yes or no - you can't 'half come'. 'You must be joking' is also possible, but very rude. The politest answer is 'I'm afraid not. I'd love to but I can't. It's my turn to babysit.' (this answer gives an apology and a good reason) - This will help them to understand why some answers to Exercise 1 are right or wrong. - Distribute the handout with the four general headings of classifying ways of saying no. - Instruct them to match the answers from Exercise 1 to the appropriate heading - Monitor and guide where needed - Instruct them to match the expressions from Exercise 2 to the correct answers in Exercise 1. - Discuss the answers

Second Test (Controlled Practice) (8-10 minutes) • To concept check and prepare students for more meaningful practice

- To build up on the students' learning, give them an exercise for practice. - Distribute the handout and instruct them to individually do the exercise. - They may refer the previous exercises for help. - Monitor and guide where needed - Discuss the answers

Second Test (Free practice) (10-12 minutes) • To provide students with free practice of the functional language of saying no

The students will get extra speaking practice in saying no through three instant mini-role plays. They will sit in pairs for this activity and speak in character rather than as themselves. - Call out the roles and show a picture depicting that situation to help understand better. - After looking at the picture, the students immediately start a short conversation with their partner. - The person answering questions must always respond in the negative. - Give couple of minutes for each situation. Situation 1 Student B: You are a hotel guest who wants to ask student A, the hotel receptionist, for some help with some serious problems in your room. Situation 2 Student A: You are a police officer who has stopped Student B in the street because you think they are a bank robber. Situation 3 Student B: You are a newspaper reporter who wants to interview Student A, a famous football player.

Feedback (2-3 minutes) • To provide feedback on the use of functional language of saying no

End the lesson with a feedback on the use of functional language of saying no. Review that the most polite way of saying no to an offer or invitation is to include both an apology and a reason for saying no.

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